The T5 instruction booklet from Canon isn’t very useful. Although they mention SD, SDHC, and SDXC cards, they don’t actually provide any advice regarding which to purchase.

In order for you to start using your T5 to take pictures and record videos, I’m trying to cut through the technical language and offer some straightforward suggestions regarding memory cards.

My top priorities are cards that not only function well in these cameras but also combine dependability, accessibility, a decent range of memory sizes, and affordability. Because the T5 cannot utilize them, there is no purpose in purchasing a high-end, extremely fast, and expensive memory card. I have therefore excluded them from this list. Additionally, I’m not listing each and every card that the camera will accept.

Every so often, memory card makers introduce new versions. Additionally, due to the nature of the market, newer, faster cards can have a lower price point and are easier to get than their older, slower counterparts. Because of this, some of the ones I’ve listed here may end up being considerably faster than the camera’s minimal requirements, but they’re also probably a decent combination of affordability and accessibility. I’ll try to update this list frequently.

What size should I get is an obvious question. Many of these have memory capacities ranging from 8GB to 128GB. They’ll all function in the T5, so the decision comes down to which one gives you the most space for a future photo or video shoots.

The T5 can capture photos up to 18 megabytes in size at its best quality settings. Obviously, the length of the recording will affect the video file size. Therefore, in terms of price and convenience, 32GB and 64GB are probably good options for the majority of customers.

Following are some suggestions for SD cards compatible with the Canon Rebel T5.

Although they might not be the quickest SD cards available, they are quick enough for this camera. Additionally, it is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all SD cards that are compatible.

My focus is on cards that are quick enough for all of the functions of this camera, from a known and dependable company, easily accessible at retailers, and economical. Although you can utilize a faster, better card, doing so won’t provide any further benefits while using the camera (but you might see some faster speeds when downloading the photos to a computer, depending on your computer and memory card reader combination).

Best Canon EOS Rebel T5i Memory Cards

1. Ultra U1 UHS-I SanDisk

Fast for better photos and Full HD video(2) | (2)Full HD (1920×1080) video support may differ depending on…

Outstanding option for compact to mid-range point-and-shoot cameras

Their affordable midrange choice is the SanDisk Ultra series. The most recent Ultra cards are substantially faster than earlier models, making them a decent entry-level choice for cameras that don’t put a lot of strain on their SD card. The Extreme cards, which are the next step up, are also a nice choice, but the Ultra cards are frequently significantly less expensive. They are typically fairly simple to locate in stores as well.

SanDisk reuses the names of its models, and older, slower models are still available. The most recent Ultra card has a UHS-I interface and is rated for U1 video recording.

It is available in capacities ranging from 32GB to 256GB.

2. I Lexar 633x V30

Utilizing Class 10 performance at high-speed UHS-I technology (U1 or U3 depending on capacity) for a read

Capture spectacular 1080p full-HD, 3D, and 4K video in high-quality pictures.

For a while now, the Lexar 633x line has been a mainstay among Lexar’s SD cards. Although quicker cards are now available, this one is still quick enough for this camera and offers decent value for the money.

The fact that they are offered in sizes ranging from 32GB to TB is one of this range’s distinguishing features.

3. V30 UHS-I Kingston Canvas Select Plus

More rapid rates—Class 10 UHS-I rates of up to 100MB/s.

The card is perfect for full HD and 4K UHD video (1080P) capture thanks to its cutting-edge UHS-I interface.

Although Kingston is a less well-known company than some of the others, they have been producing dependable memory cards for a very long time. They are a company that focuses more on dependable and affordable memory cards than on the newest speeds.

The Kingston SDS2 Canvas Select Plus card isn’t the quickest in the company’s lineup, but it’s fast enough to function effectively in this camera. It comes in capacities ranging from 16GB to 128GB.

4. Elite-X V30 UHS-I from PNY

Class 10 U3 V30 speed rating, 100MB/s read speed

Speed and performance are delivered by the Class 10 U3 V30 rating for 4K Ultra HD and burst mode HD photography.

Check Amazon’s current price and availability.

Another less well-known brand is PNY, but it has a long history and produces excellent memory cards that are typically quite reasonably priced and good value.

  • Sizes for this particular device are from 64GB to 512GB.
  • V30 UHS-I Delkin Devices Advantage
  • Supports High Frame Rate Video Recording in 4K and Full HD 1080p
  • Approved for RAW Continuous Shooting

Delkin Devices has been operating for a while, although the business has been quite quiet lately. However, they have updated their complete variety of cards to streamline the range and bring the cards up to date in terms of specifications.

5. V30 UHS-I Delkin Devices Advantage

Supports High Frame Rate Video Recording in 4K and Full HD 1080p
Approved for RAW Continuous Shooting

Delkin Devices has been operating for a while, although the business has been quite quiet lately. However, they have updated their complete variety of cards to streamline the range and bring the cards up to date in terms of specifications.

The Advantage card has a UHS-I interface and a V30 rating. There are present sizes available up to 512GB.

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Corey
Freelance journalist Corey has been writing about digital photography since 2006, first as a deputy editor and then as the editor of a variety of photographic journals. Featuring expert product reviews and in-depth features

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