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Tamron 70-300mm F/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Telephoto Zoom Lens Review

When purchasing a new lens for a camera kit, a telephoto zoom lens will often be the second lens added to the collection. These lenses have a wide range of applications.

Tamron 70-300mm F/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Telephoto Zoom Lens

$439.95
5 new from $439.95
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com
$499.00
21 new from $499.00
16 used from $400.00
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com
$519.00
3 new from $499.00
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com
$699.00
21 new from $699.00
2 used from $618.00
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com
$749.00
3 new from $749.00
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com

As a general rule, increasing lens size and weight are associated with larger focal lengths in the telephoto range. Tamron has been known to shake things up with their Di III range, and with the Tamron 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Lens, the company continues this trend. Permit me to present you with the world’s smallest and lightest full-frame mirrorless telephoto zoom lens with a capability of 300 millimeters.

It is one thing to break a record; it is quite another to produce an overall high-quality lens that breaks the record at a price that is quite cheap. Those who have been keeping up with the evaluations of the Di III will not be surprised to learn that Tamron has taken this step.

The Range of the Focal Length

The focal length range of 70–300 millimeters is ideal for telephoto zoom lenses, which are often acquired to cover focal lengths that are longer than those covered by an individual’s general-purpose zoom lens. The maximum focal length of many general-purpose zoom lenses is between 50 and 55 millimeters, and very few people will be bothered about the relatively little difference in coverage that exists between 50 and 55 millimeters and this lens’s 70-millimeter wide end.

There are a lot of regular zoom lenses that go all the way up to 70mm, thus there is no gap between this lens and its offering. Having overlapping focal length ranges (for example, a 24-105mm range combined with a 70-300mm range) should not be the reason for alarm because photographers typically appreciate this overlap because it reduces the number of times they need to switch lenses.

The focal length range of 70–300 millimeters is useful for a broad variety of situations. The widest point of this focal length range is particularly well suited for portrait photography, while the focal lengths in the middle to the back of the range offer a fantastic perspective for headshot photos that are cropped extremely closely. Another excellent application for this range is photography of wildlife, particularly when the subject is very close and ranges in size from medium to large.

With a lens ranging from 70 to 300 millimeters installed, parents will have a wonderful time chasing their children and other members of the family around, particularly in natural settings such as the backyard, the beach, the park, or the swimming pool. This lens is capable of producing high-quality images of a wide variety of items.

The focal length range of 70–300 millimeters is useful for photographing a wide variety of athletic activities, such as those involving equestrian competition, baseball, soccer, track and field, tennis, swimming and diving, and more.

Because of the relatively small maximum aperture opening (which will be covered in the following section), this lens is best suited for shooting activities that take place outside rather than inside. Are you planning on going to an air show this weekend? The focal length range of 70–300 millimeters is an excellent option.

When I am photographing landscapes, I almost always want to have at least the majority of this focal length range covered.

Max Aperture

The number f/4.5-6.3 that is listed in the lens’s name denotes the maximum aperture opening of the lens as well as the ratio of lens opening to focal length. The lower the number, the more light the lens will let reach the sensor, which will allow for shorter exposure times as well as lower ISO settings with less noise. The quantity of light that reaches the sensor either doubles or halves with each “stop” in the aperture setting (examples: f/2.8, f/4.0, f/5.6, f/8, and f/11) (a big deal).

Because the aperture is defined as the ratio of the lens opening to the focal length, and because this lens’s maximum opening does not rise sufficiently with increasing focal length to keep the same ratio, this lens has a maximum aperture that can change depending on the situation.

When the focal length is increased, the widest aperture measurement that is obtainable will become smaller. All zoom lenses with a focal length of more than 200 millimeters have this variable maximum aperture function unless the lens is enormous, cumbersome, and prohibitively costly.

Image Stabilization

Image stabilization is left up to the camera with Tamron lenses. Image stabilization is a very important feature, particularly at telephoto focal lengths, however removing the optical stabilization mechanism from a lens can reduce its size, weight, and cost. This is especially true for telephoto lenses.

The inclusion of Steady Shot IBIS (In-Body Image Stabilization) in Sony’s mirrorless cameras makes up for the absence of this feature, which is a huge relief. If the camera is a standard DSLR with an optical viewfinder, then using IBIS will not result in a stabilized view. This means that stabilization will not aid with composition and will not provide the camera’s autofocus system with a subject that is still.

The picture that is shown in the viewfinder comes straight from the image sensor and is stabilized since electronic viewfinders are so ubiquitous in Sony’s E-mount compatible lineup. As a result, the image in the viewfinder is beautifully stabilized, and sensor-based AF is able to take use of the stabilized vision in order to achieve greater accuracy.

Quality of the Image

Good sharpness, which is a mix of resolution and contrast, is at the top of our needs list. This is because the picture quality that is created by a lens is the most important factor in our decision-making process for many of us. When it comes to this matter, the price tag on the Tamron 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Lens instantly raises suspicions. How sharp could possibly be a lens that costs so little?

The center of the frame results with the aperture wide open range from outstanding at 70mm and 100mm to slightly soft at 300mm, with the steady loss of sharpness coming over the longer half of the focal length range. In general, the sharpness of a lens is not as good when it is set to its widest possible aperture as it is when it has been closed down one or two stops.

At focal lengths of 70mm and 100mm, when enhancements are not required, a shutter speed reduction of about one stop gives a marginal increase in image quality. At 200 millimeters, the aperture that is one stop smaller produces a minor improvement, and at 300 millimeters, when the gain is required, f/8 brings about a substantial positive shift in the image. The results obtained with the 300mm f/8 lens are satisfactory, although they are not quite as good as those obtained with the 70mm f/4.5 lens.

In general, lenses are not as sharp around the edges since here is where light rays have to be bent more sharply than in the middle of the lens. When shot with the aperture wide open, the results in the middle third of the frame are noticeably blurry at the shorter end of the focal length range and moderately crisp at the longer end.

The results from the deep periphery do not differ much from the results from the center of the frame, with the exception of 100 millimeters, where the review lens is quite soft. When stopped down to f/8, there is only a marginal increase in the results obtained at the periphery, with 100 millimeters exhibiting the largest improvement.

You will discover in the following sections many sets of 100% resolution center of the frame crops that were recorded in uncompressed RAW format using a Sony a7R III camera. The pictures were edited in Capture One using the Natural Clarity method, and the level of sharpness was reduced to merely “30” on a scale that goes from 0-1000.

It is important to keep in mind that the photos produced by virtually all cameras require some degree of sharpening; nevertheless, sharpening settings that are too high are detrimental to image details and disguise the shortcomings of a lens.

Focusing

The RXD (Rapid eXtra-silent stepping Drive) motor unit is featured prominently in the product name of the Tamron 28-200mm f/2.8-5.6 Di III RXD Lens. This lens has an aperture range of f/2.8-5.6. “RXD makes use of an actuator to provide fine control over the rotational angle of the motor. This enables the motor to drive the focusing lens in a way that does not require it to go through a reduction gear.

When photographing continuously moving subjects or video, having an autofocus system that is both fast and accurate is ideal, and having a sensor that can properly identify the location of the lens makes that possible “[Tamron USA] [Tamron]

The autofocus mechanism of the Tamron 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Lens is remarkably silent and operates at a good clip. Keep in mind that the speed at which the camera can focus is affected by the camera itself. Even when focusing at the same distance with the same subject, the Sony a7R III and a7R IV defocus the lens somewhat before focusing on the target in AF-S (single shot) focus mode, which results in an overall unsatisfactory focus speed for the cameras.

The defocus and focus process is eliminated when the lens is set to AF-C (continuous) focus mode, which enables the user to experience the lens’s lightning-fast focus speed to its full potential.

Accuracy in autofocus is of the highest importance, and this lens performed really well in that sense. This lens is not a viable option for use in low-light autofocus situations since the apertures are quite small.

Constructive Excellence and Functionality

Even though it is lightweight and has an exterior made of polycarbonate, which is not at all reminiscent of a robust design (like the other Di III lenses), this lens has the appearance and the feel of a high-quality product.

The fact that this lens has such precise tolerances on its moving parts, including virtually no movement on the enlarged inner barrel, provides additional reassurance that its design was thoughtfully crafted and that contemporary building practices were applied.

The lens has a very pleasant smooth and thin shape, and the matte or satin black finish, together with the engraved white writing that has a contemporary and attractive font style, gives it an air of sophistication.

Price, Value, Wrap Up

Tamron’s Di III lenses are known for offering exceptional value, and the Tamron 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Lens, which has an extremely competitive price point, is a prime example of this.

What does “Di III” mean? The Di III lenses from Tamron are interchangeable lens optics that are intended for use on mirrorless camera bodies. All Sony E-mount cameras, including those with full-frame and APS-C sensor formats, are compatible with the Tamron 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Lens.

“This product is designed, manufactured, and marketed based on the specifications of E-mount which were revealed by Sony Corporation in accordance with the licensing agreement with Sony Corporation.” [Tamron] Tamron USA offers a comforting 6-year limited guarantee on all of its products.

Tamron 70-300mm F/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Telephoto Zoom Lens Price

$439.95
5 new from $439.95
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com
$499.00
21 new from $499.00
16 used from $400.00
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com
$519.00
3 new from $499.00
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com
$699.00
21 new from $699.00
2 used from $618.00
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com
$749.00
3 new from $749.00
as of December 9, 2022 12:29 pm
Amazon.com

Sample Images

Tamron AT CEIF