The silver FUJIFILM X-E3 is a slender, flexible camera that represents a step forward in the company’s rangefinder-style mirrorless line. It has an improved sensor and processor, as well as the same iconic appearance as its predecessors.

More: Best Gimbal For Fujifilm X-E3

High-resolution stills may be captured with exceptional sharpness and clarity because of the organic arrangement of the sensor and the absence of an optical low-pass filter in the 24.3MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor and the X-Processor Pro image processor.

The sensor and CPU combination also enables fast continuous shooting at up to 14 frames per second, a wide sensitivity range of up to ISO 51200, and the ability to capture UHD 4K/30 video or Full HD 1080p/60 video in addition to still images. Additionally, when dealing with moving subjects, the continuous autofocus performance has been adjusted to provide improved moving subject tracking and overall accuracy, as well as improved overall performance.

In addition to its imaging capabilities, the X-E3 retains its retro-inspired physical design, which includes a high-resolution 2.36 million-dot electronic viewfinder, 3.0 inch LCD screen, and a 3.0-inch touchscreen “The camera has a rear touchscreen LCD with 1.04 million dots, as well as physical shutter speed and exposure compensation dials. Bluetooth connectivity has now been added, allowing for low-power picture sharing and remote camera operation from a connected mobile device.

The Best Lenses For Fujifilm X-E3

1. Fujifilm 35mm f/2

It should come as no surprise that Fujifilm’s prime lenses, in especially the 35mm f/2, are at the top of our list because the company is best renowned for street photography and portraiture, and its prime lenses in particular.

This lightweight lens has an equivalent focal length of 53 millimeters and is priced affordably despite its exceptional clarity and performance in low light. Do not continue your search if you are interested in purchasing an X-mount walk-around lens that will assist you in bringing both your trip photography and your everyday photography to the next level.

The 35mm f/1.4 lens below is an alternative that comes at a higher price in this focal length range. Although the f/1.4 has a maximum aperture that is one-stop quicker, we decided to go with the f/2 since it was cheaper ($599) and lighter (10.3 ounces), despite the fact that the f/1.4 has a faster maximum aperture by one stop.

Grab the f/1.4 version if cost and weight aren’t the main issues for you or if you are a professional who depends on this focal length, but we believe that the 35mm f/2 is more than an adequate lens for most individuals and is a terrific deal.

2. Fujifilm 23mm f/2

With a 35mm focal length equivalent that is a touch on the short side for portraiture, the Fujifilm 23mm f/2 is not nearly as adaptable as the 35mm f/2 lens that was discussed before. This prime lens, on the other hand, offers excellent optics and is well suited for street photography and travel because it is compact, crisp, quick to focus and even comes with weather sealing. In our opinion, that covers pretty much everything there is to know about it.

The more expensive Fujifilm 23mm f/1.4 is one-stop quicker, making it an attractive option for photography amateurs and pros who frequently use this focal length. It is correct that this lens will provide you with excellent bokeh and depth of field, and it is a wonderful complement to high-end Fujifilm cameras such as the X-Pro2.

However, considering that the f/2 version costs more than twice as much and is over 4 ounces heavier, not to mention having slower autofocus, the majority of consumers will find that the f/2 version is sufficient for their needs.

3. Fujifilm 10-24mm f/4

We are disappointed that Fujifilm X Mount does not provide a wider selection of wide-angle lenses, and an f/2.8 zoom does not appear to be completely out of the question. However, this does not prevent the 10-24mm f/4 from being an outstanding lens when viewed on its whole. It is eerily comparable to the 16-35mm full-frame lenses that are so popular among pros since it has a focal length equivalent of 15-36mm and has the same focal length range.

We have grown to anticipate high levels of sharpness, little distortion, quality construction, and image stabilization from Fujifilm, and this lens more than lives up to those expectations. If you take landscapes or other photos that need a wide-angle lens with your Fujifilm camera, this is your best option.

The price is the primary consideration while selecting the Fujifilm 10-24mm f/4 lens. It may seem like a lot of money to spend on a lens that only has an aperture of f/4 and isn’t weather-sealed, but wide-angle photographers don’t have a lot of X-Mount alternatives to choose from.

Although we are fans of the Fujifilm 14mm f/2.8 prime lens, its high price, and limited functionality prevent us from recommending it. The Rokinon 12mm f/2 below is a fun manual focus lens that gets your foot in the door of the wide-angle world without breaking the bank. If you’re truly seeking to save money, this is the lens for you.

4. Fujifilm 56mm f/1.2

We are pleased to introduce you to the quickest lens in the Fujifilm portfolio. This portrait lens for Fujifilm mirrorless cameras boasts a maximum aperture of f/1.2 and an equivalent focal length of 85mm, making it the best option for shooting portraits.

The bokeh, depth of field, and color rendering of this lens are unrivaled in the X-Mount range, and the lens works exceptionally well even when open to its maximum aperture. This lens is an absolute need if you intend to take portrait photography seriously and you have the financial means to do so.

The autofocus is the one and only major issue we have with the Fujifilm 56mm f/1.2 lens. In this area in general, Fujifilm cameras have lagged behind Sony and others, and this lens has a propensity to hunt on occasion (low contrast situations can cause the most problems). However, at this point, all we are doing is taking apart an issue that

5. Fujifilm 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 OIS

It should come as no surprise that Fujifilm’s prime lenses, in especially the 35mm f/2, are at the top of our list because the company is best renowned for street photography and portraiture, and its prime lenses in particular. This lightweight lens has an equivalent focal length of 53 millimeters and is priced affordably despite its exceptional clarity and performance in low light.

Do not continue your search if you are interested in purchasing an X-mount walk-around lens that will assist you in bringing both your trip photography and your everyday photography to the next level.

The 35mm f/1.4 lens below is an alternative that comes at a higher price in this focal length range. Although the f/1.4 has a maximum aperture that is one-stop quicker, we decided to go with the f/2 since it was cheaper ($599) and lighter (10.3 ounces), despite the fact that the f/1.4 has a faster maximum aperture by one stop.

Grab the f/1.4 version if cost and weight aren’t the main issues for you or if you are a professional who depends on this focal length, but we believe that the 35mm f/2 is more than an adequate lens for most individuals and is a terrific deal.

6. Fujifilm 35mm f/1.4

The Fujifilm 35mm f/1.4 is the second “nifty fifty” on this list and has an equivalent focal length of 52.5 millimeters, making it an extremely flexible lens. We gave some thought to placing it higher on the list than the f/2 version, which is now in the first place, but ultimately decided against it for a few different reasons.

The first is the autofocus, which, depending on the lighting conditions, might be a sluggish and noisy process. The second disadvantage is the cost, which is significantly higher at around $200. Both of these lenses are of high quality, so you won’t go wrong with any choice; but, we believe that an aperture of f/2 will be sufficient for the vast majority of users.

However, people who don’t intend to remove this lens from their camera very often may consider purchasing the Fujifilm 35mm f/1.4 since it is a worthwhile investment. This lens is quick, it’s crisp, and it has an outstanding build quality; it strikes the target practically everywhere you look.

Because of how well it performs even in dim light, the f/1.4 aperture is the go-to choice for photographers who specialize in weddings and other formal events.

7. Fujifilm 18-55mm f/2.8-4 OIS

However, labeling the Fujifilm 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens a “kit” lens would be doing it an injustice because it is marketed with cameras such as the X-T2 and X-T20. This Fujifilm 18-55mm kit lens is built better and is optically far superior when compared to rival 18-55mm kit lenses made by Nikon and Canon, which are usually made of plastic and have a mixed reputation. This lens is sharp all the way to the middle of its zoom range with very little distortion, and it has a relatively fast maximum aperture of f/2.8 at the widest end of its range.

When everything is taken into account, the price that you pay for the Fujifilm 18-55mm f/2.8-4 has a direct bearing on how we feel about the lens. It is usual practice for the lens to be sold for an additional $300 over the cost of the camera body when it is sold as part of a variety of Fujifilm packages; this represents an excellent deal. Even at its full list price of $699, it is still a great lens, but it is not nearly as appealing.

8. Fujifilm 50-230mm f/4.5-6.7

Even though much of the focus has been placed on Fujifilm’s exceptional prime lenses, there is always room in your bag for a nice telephoto lens to round out your collection. In terms of optical quality and performance, the 55-200mm lens mentioned earlier comes out on top; nevertheless, because of its hefty price tag, it is out of reach for individuals who wish to utilize telephoto lenses on occasion without completely emptying their financial accounts.

The 50-230mm gives you precisely that: a nice range of focal length coverage that is comparable to 76-350mm, outstanding optics all around, and a weight that is acceptable at 13 ounces. This is our top recommendation for a cost-effective telephoto zoom for X-mount cameras.

In what ways does the Fujifilm 50-230mm fall short of expectations? The sluggish maximum aperture, which ranges from f/4.5 to 6.7, is the first thing you will notice about this camera. It is the least stunning on our list. In addition, the lens, with the exception of the glass element, is constructed nearly completely of plastic, and this includes the mount.

This does assist keep the weight down, but in terms of longevity and feel, metal is preferred. Last but not least, the lens’s ability to focus quickly and its performance in low light is commensurate with the price and aperture of the lens. However, considering both its price and its weight, the 50-230 is an excellent budget-friendly alternative to the 55-200mm and costs only a quarter of what the 100-400mm does.

9. Fujifilm 14mm f/2.8

Prime lenses are nearly usually more compact and lighter in weight than zoom lenses, which is one of the primary reasons why mirrorless camera systems are becoming increasingly popular. The Fujifilm X Mount 14mm f/2.8 is the best wide-angle prime lens available, and its equivalent focal length of 21 millimeters makes it an excellent choice for landscape photography.

It weighs 8.3 ounces, which is a significant reduction in weight compared to the 10-24mm models mentioned before (14.5 ounces). The lens has excellent sharpness, very little distortion, and decent performance in low light; it is not a letdown in terms of picture quality.

When everything is taken into consideration, the Fujifilm 14mm f/2.8 has been placed in this position because we place higher importance on the 10-24mm f/4’s greater zoom range and better adaptability. In addition, we’ve discovered that the majority of wide-angle shots are taken in natural light that’s enough for photography, which means that having a quicker maximum aperture isn’t as vital as it is when using a lens for portraits or traveling.

Both are solid choices, but given the choice between the two at comparable costs, we choose the zoom. See the Rokinon 12mm f/2 manual focus lens down below for a more affordable wide-angle prime lens.

10. Fujifilm 50mm f/2

If it weren’t for the expensive price, the Fujifilm 56mm f/1.2 would unquestionably be deserving of the number one slot in our list of the best Fujifilm lenses currently available on the market. However, portrait photographers who take into consideration both the image quality and the price should give serious thought to the 50mm f/2 lens.

This lens offers pretty much everything you could want in a camera accessory: a fast maximum aperture for good performance in low light, a quality metal design with weather sealing, and superb clarity overall. And at $449 and 7 ounces, it weighs less than half as much as the 56mm f/1.2 lens while costing less than half as much.

It’s important to keep in mind that the 76mm lens isn’t particularly adaptable in this scenario. Because it can also be used as a macro lens, purchasing this lens is an excellent choice for anyone who regularly takes shots of people or portraits. It also depends on who you talk to as to whether or not it is sharper than the 56mm lens that was mentioned earlier.

Aside from these applications, however, you are going to find that the camera has significant limits in terms of the kinds of pictures that it does not shoot really well. Putting the focal length aside, we really like the pricing, performance, and build quality of this lens, and we think it’s a great replacement for the 56mm f/1.2.

7 Fujifilm X-Mount Lenses that Missed the Cut

11. Fujifilm 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS

Fujifilm’s closest approach to an all-in-one lens is the 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6, which allows you to cover everything from wide-angle to telephoto and anything in between with a single lens.

There are a lot of things to like about this lens: it has a wide focal range, is solidly made, is weather sealed (unlike the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 kit lens), and is optically proficient enough to satisfy the needs of the majority of users. This is the place to come if you are seeking a comprehensive solution for your Fujifilm camera.

On the other hand, giving up all of Fujifilm’s incredible prime lenses in favor of an all-in-one solution just doesn’t seem right. We are usually cautious to recommend an all-in-one lens when specialty primes or zooms are preferable since many Fujifilm purchasers are image quality purists, maybe even more so than the average buyer of a Canon or Nikon APS-C camera.

This is because many Fujifilm buyers are image quality purists. If you value simplicity and adaptability above all else, the Fujifilm 18-135mm is the lens for you. However, for the majority of individuals, we believe that it is more beneficial to invest in a handful of specialized lenses.

12. Fujifilm 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 OIS

One of the most enjoyable lenses on our list is the Fujifilm 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6, despite the fact that it is not the most useful.

With a staggering focal length range that is comparable to 150-600mm, you will have greater reach than is available for virtually any other APS-C system (Panasonic does have a 100-400mm for Micro Four Thirds, which has a crop factor of 2x, but it is not quite as excellent as this lens). This is the best X-Mount telephoto lens available on the market, and it’s great for photographing everything from spots to animals.

It is easy to identify the flaws in the Fujifilm 100-400mm lens: it is more expensive than the majority of Fujifilm cameras, and its weight of over 3 pounds renders the notion of a “small” mirrorless camera system entirely useless.

But despite this, we have to give Fujifilm props for stepping up to the plate with this lens. The optics and focusing are surprisingly strong for such a long telephoto, and it even has optical image stabilization.

13. Fujifilm 16-55mm f/2.8

Because it provides maximum adaptability while making relatively little concessions in terms of optical performance, the 24-70mm f/2.8 is one of the most desirable lenses for working professionals to purchase. That is most closely approximated by Fujifilm’s 16-55mm f/2.8 lens, which has a focal length range that is comparable to 24-82.5 millimeters (even more reach than a 24-70mm).

If you attach this lens to virtually any of Fujifilm’s mirrorless cameras, you’ll be able to take excellent photographs in a wide variety of situations, from landscapes to portraits.

There are a few considerations that led to the Fujifilm 16-55mm f/2.8 not being placed higher in the rankings. The first issue is one of weight: a tiny mirrorless camera with a weight of 23.1 ounces has quite a bit of heaviness to it. The second issue is that the camera does not have image stabilization, which is something that would be really helpful in situations with low light.

Last but not least, Fujifilm’s prime lenses are of such high quality that it would be difficult to recommend passing up all of them in favor of a single zoom. We don’t intend to diminish the quality of this lens in any way—you probably won’t be dissatisfied with the photos—but there are a number of prime lenses that are lighter and cost less money above.

14. Fujifilm 16mm f/1.4

To begin, we’d want to state that 24 millimeters are not our preferred focal length setting. It is not the ideal focal length for landscape photography; the 16–21 millimeter range is more suitable for shooting in natural settings. And the ideal focal length for street photography is often between 35 and 50 millimeters. Because of this, the Fujifilm 16mm f/1.4 is something of a “tweener” in terms of the optimum applications for it.

Putting focal length considerations aside, this is one of the top-performing lenses made by Fujifilm. It has exceptional performance in low light when set to f/1.4, the ability to produce fantastic bokeh and depth of field, and it is pin-sharp with very little distortion.

There are no issues that we have with the picture quality that this lens provides, and considering that the Fujifilm 14mm f/2.8 is two stops slower, this lens is a feasible alternative for wide-angle prime photography for individuals who place a premium on speed.

15. Rokinon 12mm f/2 for Fujifilm

In light of the somewhat pricey wide-angle lens alternatives shown before, such as the 10-14mm f/4 and the 14mm f/2.8, the decision to go with the Rokinon 12mm f/2 represents some creative thinking beyond the norm.

This manual focus lens is available in a Fujifilm X Mount and may be purchased for a price that is far lower than $250. The most striking thing about it is its maximum aperture of f/2, which is fantastic for astrophotography and other types of photography that need low light.

The manual focusing might be a challenge for certain photographers (we found it to be a tad clumsy with this lens), but the clarity and build quality are outstanding.

As a point of reference, the Zeiss 12mm Touit features optics that are comparable but costs more than twice as much. Although you shouldn’t expect this lens to equal the craftsmanship or picture quality of your Zeiss, it’s still a lot of fun to play about with and it’s a great deal.

16. Fujifilm 50-140mm f/2.8 OIS

As we approach closer to the end of our list, we get to another premium zoom lens, this one built to roughly match the focal length range that is commonly used for 70-200mm lenses. This lens will fulfill all of your needs from the medium telephoto range and beyond thanks to its constant maximum aperture of f/2.8, its weather sealing, and its image stabilization.

The optical performance of this lens is superior to that of the 55-200mm or 100-400mm lenses described above; but, it does not have the same reach for photographing animals or other subjects that are located at a greater distance.

Because of the narrow focal length range that it offers, the Fujifilm 50-140mm f/2.8 is the third telephoto lens that is described on this page. Despite having a smaller maximum aperture, the fact that the 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 has a longer reach and is lighter is something that we enjoy.

In addition, the 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 has such a remarkable zoom range that it is difficult for aficionados of telephoto photography to pass it up. However, the image quality is the finest of the lot for telephoto photography, making it ideal for portrait and travel photographers who wish to cover this portion of the focal length range.

17. Fujifilm 60mm f/2.4 Macro

There are not many choices available for macro photography using the Fujifilm X Mount lens mount, which may discourage professional macro photographers from investing in the system. The Fujifilm 60mm f/2.4 is a respectable alternative; it achieves a focal length that is comparable to a 90mm lens. This lens is only 7.6 ounces in weight, however, it is crisp, has good focus, and has a great build from Fujifilm.

The term “Macro” itself is the source of our primary concern with this lens. The lens only has a magnification factor of 1:2, while the majority of actual macro lenses have a factor of 1:1. The Zeiss Touit 50mm f/2.8 is yet another choice for the Fujifilm X Mount.

Although it offers a magnification ratio of 1:1, this lens is fairly costly at over $1,000 and does not get as near to the subject as we would like it to. These two “macro” lenses from Fujifilm are adequate, but we really hope that the company will add more macro options to its catalog in the years to come.

Previous articleBest Gimbal for Nikon D6 in 2023
Next articleBest Fujifilm X-E1 Lenses in 2023
Corey
Freelance journalist Corey has been writing about digital photography since 2006, first as a deputy editor and then as the editor of a variety of photographic journals. Featuring expert product reviews and in-depth features

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here