Accessories Buying Guide

Best Fujifilm X-T10 Memory Cards

Best Fujifilm X-T10 Memory Cards

The 2012-released Fujifilm X-T10 has one SD memory card slot that is UHS-I compatible.

It can record in Full HD, which is no problem for today’s memory cards, and has a relatively tiny buffer (10 JPEGs, 7 RAW files), so you don’t need the quickest memory card. Despite this, you still want a dependable card from a reputable company that won’t make you wait to fire off a series of shots.

The SanDisk Extreme PRO 64GB memory card is our top pick for the Fujifilm X-T10. It is the cheapest UHS-I U3 card available and typically the quickest card for all cameras.

These are the top 3 memory cards (with the best price/speed ratio) after examining all the available memory cards.

Most effective Fujifilm X-T 10 Memory Cards

  • Extreme PRO UHS-I (95 MB/s) SanDisk
  • 300MB/s Lexar Professional 2000x UHS-II
  • The 150MB/s Lexar Professional 1000x UHS-II
  • Reminders Regarding Memory Cards

Here are a few essential considerations for buying an SD memory card.

  • ALWAYS purchase multiple SD cards.
  • Memory cards are not indestructible.
  • You can insert another card if you run out of room while firing.
  • Create a rotation between the images on your camera’s card and the ones you’re transferring onto your computer by having two to four cards available.
  • Card size is not as crucial as purchasing multiple cards.
  • A backup card or cards are significantly more valuable in real life than card capacity.
  • If you must, forego a meal instead of purchasing a low-quality SD card.
  • Your camera won’t operate as efficiently if you have a faulty memory card.
  • There could be severe repercussions if the card fails unexpectedly.

If you’re interested in learning more, our partner site, Best Photography Gear, has a detailed analysis of the many memory card manufacturers, terminologies, and expressions available. They simplify things so that you may choose the best option by easily comprehending the differences.

Best Fujifilm X-T10 Memory Cards

1. 64GB SanDisk Extreme Pro

Our best pick: For such a low price, there is nothing better than the SanDisk Extreme Pro 64GB (95MB/s). Simply because it is UHS-I U3 at 95MB/s and incredibly effective, consistently hitting high writing and reading rates, it is our most highly recommended card for practically all cameras.

For videos and sports, it is quick enough.

2. Professional 2000x UHS-II Lexar

the Lexar Professional 2000x is the fastest SD card currently available. You will only see the gain while transferring your files to the computer, though, because it is UHS-II and the X-T10 can’t benefit from the quicker speed (it will be much faster). It’s up to you to determine whether that’s worth more than double the money, but if you frequently transfer hundreds of photographs or plan to upgrade in the coming years, it might not be a terrible idea.

For the simple reason that the X-T10 can only record data at UHS-I speeds, it will be just as quick in-camera as the SanDisk above.

3. lexar-professional-64gb-1000x-u3

The card above comes in a slower, less expensive variant called the Lexar Professional 1000x 64GB. The maximum speed is 150MB/s as opposed to 300MB/s, however, because it is still UHS-II U3, the lowest speed is always 30MB/s.

Despite being UHS-II, it costs less than SanDisk yet is slightly slower. Although not in-camera, you will see an improvement in reading speeds (i.e., moving the photos, displaying files, etc.).

You’ll be alright if you stick with Lexar, SanDisk, Transcend, and Sony cards. Never purchase a cheap, arbitrary card because you will quickly lose your photos.

Avoid purchasing memory cards from unreliable manufacturers or deals that seem too good to be true. The majority of the time, the cards will malfunction just when you need them most.

All of your work is kept on a memory card until it is transferred to a computer.

Make sure to purchase a card from one of the following manufacturers: Kingston, Transcend, Lexar, or SanDisk. Although there are a few good ones available, the five we listed are more than sufficient.

Corey
About Author

Corey

Freelance journalist Corey has been writing about digital photography since 2006, first as a deputy editor and then as the editor of a variety of photographic journals. Featuring expert product reviews and in-depth features

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